For a Diversified Networked Culture : Bringing the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions in the digital age

The digital age, and especially Internet, fundamentally transforms thedomain of creation and all its dimensions, artistic, social and economic. These transformations are accompanied by opportunities and risks for the diversity of cultural expressions, whether we consider the issue of fully benefiting from opportunities inherent to the digital age or the capacity of actors to face the challenges it brings at the national and international levels in the cultural domain. The implementation of the CPPDCE in the digital age can allow States to find answers and modes of
action (measures, policies or others) that can produce the required institutional environment for the digital revolution to become a genuine vector of innovations in the promotion and protection of a diversity of cultural expressions. Our study answers the specific following questions as proposed by the MAEDI and MCC (France):

➡ What concrete challenges to the diversity of cultural expressions
Convention Parties face in the digital era, and especially in developing countries?
➡ Which measures or policies are created to implement the 2005
Convention principles in the digital environment, and what would be
the conditions to replicate or adapt existing good practices?
➡ What could be the structure and added value of writing up new specific operational guidelines, how could these be linked to existing ones
and how can we estimate the costs associated with this operation?


Brief on the Tax Challenges arising from digitalisation: Interim report 2018

The integration of national economies and markets has increased substantially in recent
years, putting a strain on the international tax rules, which were designed more than a
century ago. Weaknesses in the current rules create opportunities for base erosion and
profit shifting (BEPS), requiring bold moves by policy makers to restore confidence in
the system and ensure that profits are taxed where economic activities take place and
value is created.

Following the release of the report Addressing Base Erosion and Profit Shifting in
February 2013, OECD and G20 countries adopted a 15-point Action Plan to address
BEPS in September 2013. The Action Plan identified 15 actions along three key pillars:
introducing coherence in the domestic rules that affect cross-border activities, reinforcing
substance requirements in the existing international standards, and improving
transparency as well as certainty.

After two years of work, measures in response to the 15 actions were delivered to G20
Leaders in Antalya in November 2015. All the different outputs, including those
delivered in an interim form in 2014, were consolidated into a comprehensive package.
The BEPS package of measures represents the first substantial renovation of the
international tax rules in almost a century. Once the new measures become applicable, it
is expected that profits will be reported where the economic activities that generate them
are carried out and where value is created. BEPS planning strategies that rely on outdated
rules or on poorly co-ordinated domestic measures will be rendered ineffective.

Implementation is now the focus of this work. The BEPS package is designed to be
implemented via changes in domestic law and practices, and via treaty provisions. With
the negotiation for a multilateral instrument (MLI) having been finalised in 2016 to
facilitate the implementation of the treaty related measures, 67 countries signed the MLI
on 7 June 2017, paving the way for swift implementation of the treaty related measures.
OECD and G20 countries also agreed to continue to work together to ensure a consistent
and co-ordinated implementation of the BEPS recommendations and to make the project
more inclusive. Globalisation requires that global solutions and a global dialogue be
established which go beyond OECD and G20 countries.

A better understanding of how the BEPS recommendations are implemented in practice
could reduce misunderstandings and disputes between governments. Greater focus on
implementation and tax administration should therefore be mutually beneficial to
governments and business. Proposed improvements to data and analysis will help support
ongoing evaluation of the quantitative impact of BEPS, as well as evaluating the impact
of the countermeasures developed under the BEPS Project.

As a result, the OECD established an Inclusive Framework on BEPS, bringing all
interested and committed countries and jurisdictions on an equal footing in the
Committee on Fiscal Affairs and all its subsidiary bodies. The Inclusive Framework,
which already has more than 100 members, will monitor and peer review the implementation of the minimum standards as well as complete the work on standard
setting to address BEPS issues. In addition to BEPS Members, other international
organisations and regional tax bodies are involved in the work of the Inclusive
Framework, which also consults business and the civil society on its different work
streams.


Proceedings of the international symposium on the measurement of digital cultural products

The International Symposium on the Measurement of Digital Cultural Products, jointly sponsored by the Observatoire de la culture et des communications (OCCQ) at the Institut de la statistique du Québec (ISQ) and the UNESCO Institute of Statistics (UIS), in collaboration with the Carmelle and Rémi-Marcoux Chair in Arts Management at HEC-Montreal, was held May 9-11, 2016.

Bringing together over 130 participants and 50 presenters, over half of whom were from other countries, the purpose of this symposium was to examine the issues confronting statistics agencies arising from new platforms for disseminating digital cultural content and their impact on the market. Researchers and experts were invited to present new methods, practices and innovations to enhance understanding of the challenges in producing statistics on the economics of culture and digital cultural
products.


Global Report 2018: Re | SHAPING CULTURAL POLICIES

The Global Report series has been designed to monitor the implementation of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (2005). It provides evidence of how this implementation process contributes to attaining the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals and targets.
The 2018 Global Report analyses progress achieved in implementing the 2005 Convention since the first Global Report was published in 2015.

WHY

The Global Report series produce new and valuable evidence to inform cultural policy making and advance creativity for development.

HOW

Grounded in the analysis of the Quadrennial Periodic Reports submitted by Parties to the Convention and relevant new findings, this report examines how the 2005 Convention has inspired policy change at the global and country level in ten areas of monitoring. It puts forward a set of policy recommendations for the future, addressing the adaptation of cultural policies to rapid change in the digital environment, based on human rights and fundamental freedoms of expression.


What future for the Diversity of cultural expressions online?

Last October, the CRTC launched a consultation on the future of program distribution models in Canada. In this report, (release expected on June 1st) the board must indicate how these models should evolve to support “the creation, production and distribution of Canadian programming in both official languages, including original programming in the fields of entertainment and information " , as well as discuss the public’s access to content.

Several members of the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (CDCE) participated in these consultations. Their contributions identified the apparent changes brought about by the growing presence of online services in their sector, particularly in the field of music, audio and video -and the measures to ensure, in the future, a diversity of cultural expressions online.

The event will allow the public get acquainted with the report, listen to the reactions of representatives from the cultural sectors who have participated in the consultation, and exchange with the audience around the issues raised around and in the report.

Wednesday, June, 6, 2018 - DGC Ontario

  1. Presentation of the CRTC's report on future programming distribution models

- with Suzanne Lamarre, Lawyer, Eng. P.Eng, Terrien Couture

Expert in laws and regulations of telecommunications, radiocommunication and broadcasting, Ms. Lamarre served on the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) from 2008 to 2013.

  1. Reactions to the CRTC report in a roundtable format with:

- Erin Finlay, Chief Legal Officer, Canadian Media Production Association - CMP

- Elliott Anderson, Director, Public Policy & Communications, Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists- ACTRA

- Margaret McGuffin, Executive Director, Canadian Music Publishers Association

  1. Discussion

4 :30 pm : Reception

Free entrance, registration required


What future for the Diversity of cultural expressions online?

Last October, the CRTC launched a consultation on the future of program distribution models in Canada. In this report, (release expected on June 1st) the board must indicate how these models should evolve to support “the creation, production and distribution of Canadian programming in both official languages, including original programming in the fields of entertainment and information " , as well as discuss the public’s access to content.

Several members of the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (CDCE) participated in these consultations. Their contributions identified the apparent changes brought about by the growing presence of online services in their sector, particularly in the field of music, audio and video -and the measures to ensure, in the future, a diversity of cultural expressions online.

The event will allow the public get acquainted with the report, listen to the reactions of representatives from the cultural sectors who have participated in the consultation, and exchange with the audience around the issues raised around and in the report.

Wednesday, June, 6, 2018 - DGC Ontario
  1. Presentation of the CRTC's report on future programming distribution models

- with Suzanne Lamarre, Lawyer, Eng. P.Eng, Terrien Couture

Expert in laws and regulations of telecommunications, radiocommunication and broadcasting, Ms. Lamarre served on the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) from 2008 to 2013.

  1. Reactions to the CRTC report in a roundtable format with:

- Erin Finlay, Chief Legal Officer, Canadian Media Production Association - CMP

- Elliott Anderson, Director, Public Policy & Communications, Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists- ACTRA

- Margaret McGuffin, Executive Director, Canadian Music Publishers Association

  1. Discussion

4 :30 pm : Reception

Free entrance, registration required

 


CPTPP and cultural exception

Canada has signed a new Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) with ten countries. Without the United States. Canadian negotiators have counteracted the cultural intrusion that the previous agreement sanctioned in order to maintain cultural exception. There is hope that the threat to the cultural policies of Quebec and Canada and Canadian cultural sovereignty is protected in the tentative agreement for a new version of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) signed in march 2018 in Santiago, Chili. The Minister of Heritage has announced that this treaty with eleven partners includes a clause protecting national cultural policies.

Canada pushed to change provisions relating to culture and French-language rights. It said the other 10 countries did “affirm the right of each party to preserve, develop and implement its cultural policies.

The revised deal, officially known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, is the first time a Canadian trade deal has included cultural exemptions that specifically include web content, says Melanie Joly. Notably, the deal REAFFIRMS the importance of promoting corporate social responsibility, cultural identity and diversity, as the importance of preserving their right to regulate in the public interest.


2018-2019 Provincial Budget for Culture

The Couillard government unveils an important budget for culture- the largest in 20 years. It is marked by an 11% increase in spending for the programs of the Ministry of Culture, a raise of 778.3 million dollar for the cultural sector. Nevertheless, a significant portion of the credits still remains to be specified. 509 million is planned to deploy the next cultural policy. The goal is to bring culture closer to youth and community; nurture creation and excellence; support culture and heritage in all regions of Quebec and deploy Québec’s culture in the digital environment.

108.6 million remain to be defined, currently classified under “other measures of cultural policy”.

We still need to wait for the unveiling of this policy to disclose the the precise orientation of this significant amount.